NBN surpasses gigabit download speeds on fixed wireless

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NBN surpasses gigabit download speeds on fixed wireless

NBN has claimed a new technology milestone by achieving gigabit download speeds on a fixed wireless connection during a demonstration.

The test conducted in Ballarat achieved 1.1Gbps downstream and 165Mbps upstream speeds by bonding three wireless networking termination devices together, with the antenna located on the roof of a nearby school. NBN also demonstrated speeds of 400Mbps/55Mbps, 250Mbps/50Mbps and 100/40Mbps using a single antenna.

The demonstration was conducted using carrier aggregation technology, which fused seven carriers on the 3.4GHz spectrum and four carriers on the 2.3GHz spectrum.

The trial used a spare operating sector on an established NBN fixed wireless tower and was conducted alongside NBN's technology partners Ericsson, NetComm Wireless, Qualcomm and Mill Software.

Last month, NBN announced it had increased fixed wireless speeds from 50Mbps to 100Mbps, putting wireless on par with the majority of speeds offered in metropolitan areas. A retail product with 100Mbps fixed wireless speeds is expected to launch early next year aimed at regional businesses.

NBN chief executive Bill Morrow revealed that the fixed wireless footprint would expand from 500,000 premises to 600,000.

“Our ability to deliver gigabit speeds on Fixed Wireless demonstrates our continued focus on identifying and implementing tech advancements as and when they are needed, across all technologies," he said.

Chief executive of the Regional Australia Institute Jack Archer added that quality access was a hindrance for people to move away from cities and into regional areas.

“That’s why it is great to see NBN trialling higher speed services on its fixed wireless network – this will help make the regional dream possible in the future for a lot more Australians in a lot more places,” he said.

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